Reposted – Critique: 6 Tips for One Characters

​Check out this piece by K.M. Weiland: Critique: 6 Tips for Introducing Characters Most of the time, I hate real-life introductions. For one thing, I almost always forget the person’s name in the rush of shaking hands, smiling, and saying something charmingly banal. Then there’s the small talk, important but often tedious. Squirm. But that’s most of … Continue reading Reposted – Critique: 6 Tips for One Characters

The Iconic Feminine – Are Modern Writers Shying Away from This Archetype?

Michael Critzer, also known as Professor Geek, returns in this excellent video on the Iconic Feminine. He uses the original She-Ra and the Netflix remake to emphasize his point. This makes the topic even more interesting if you only have a minimal knowledge of one or the other series. It’s rather obvious who needs to … Continue reading The Iconic Feminine – Are Modern Writers Shying Away from This Archetype?

Reposted: Writing Week – moving from complicated to complex

Take a look at this excellent piece by Mr. Winchester, readers: Writing Week - moving from complicated to complex There’s probably some irony in trying to make the subject of complexity itself a simple discussion. “It’s too easy to cross the line from complex to complicated. And complicated is bad.” -Chuck of SFDebris If I was … Continue reading Reposted: Writing Week – moving from complicated to complex

Show, Don’t Tell: The Proper Use of Psychology in Fiction

You can’t study men, you can only get to know them. – from C.S. Lewis’ That Hideous Strength Among the many items professional writers suggest aspiring authors read in order to refine their craft, psychology likely ranks somewhere in the top ten. The reason for this is simple: men are a product of their environment, … Continue reading Show, Don’t Tell: The Proper Use of Psychology in Fiction

Reposted: Writing Legal Fiction: 4 Research Tips

​Check out this informative piece by Christina Kaye, readers: Writing Legal Fiction: 4 Research Tips On television crime dramas, DNA comes back in three minutes, crimes are solved in less than forty-two minutes, and defendants always confess to everything right there on the stand in front of judge and jury. While I can see the … Continue reading Reposted: Writing Legal Fiction: 4 Research Tips