Big Boys Don’t Cry! – A Look at Male Vulnerability in Fiction

There is a trend – perhaps seen frequently now, perhaps still moving about “on little cat feet,” as the poet says of the fog – that praises how men are crying more in films and TV shows. It may include books as well, but if so, I have yet to see those mentioned. A great … Continue reading Big Boys Don’t Cry! – A Look at Male Vulnerability in Fiction

Nice Guys Finish Last? Depends on One’s Definition of “Nice”

We have discussed Nice Girls, but what about Nice Guys? The standard response to that is: “Yeah, well, you know where Nice Guys finish – last.” Depending on the definition of “nice” in use, this can be quite true. But as with Nice Girls, Nice Guys do not all follow the perceived pattern of “nice” … Continue reading Nice Guys Finish Last? Depends on One’s Definition of “Nice”

Nice Girls – Are They More or Less Difficult to Write than Bad Girls?

“Playing good girls in the ‘30s was difficult, when the fad was to play bad girls. Actually I think playing bad girls is a bore; I have always had more luck with good girl roles because they require more from an actress.” Olivia De Havilland via BrainyQuote.com Olivia De Haviland as Melanie Hamilton in Gone … Continue reading Nice Girls – Are They More or Less Difficult to Write than Bad Girls?

The Fall of the Apprentice – A Compare and Contrast

Reading Charles Edward Pogue’s novelization of Dragonheart* – for which he also wrote the screenplay – I was struck again by an idea that had flitted through my mind on a previous occasion. This is the difference between the corruption of Einon, the prince in the film* and the novel Dragonheart, and the fall of … Continue reading The Fall of the Apprentice – A Compare and Contrast

Mad Scientist: Cackling Goofball, or Deadly Menace?

The popular image of the mad scientist is one of a frizzy haired, generally harmless older man messing around in a lab. Such mad scientists seem and are typically portrayed as relatively inoffensive. Doctor Doofensmirtz from Phineas and Ferb* is one example of this common perception of the mad scientist, with Back to the Future’s* … Continue reading Mad Scientist: Cackling Goofball, or Deadly Menace?

Sincerity in Fiction – A Lost Art in Need of Recovery

While on the Superversive Sunday Livestream, Anthony Marchetta and I discussed the differences between Japanese anime and modern Western storytelling. One of the items that came up was the sincerity with which Japanese writers portray their characters. Although I wanted a stronger word for the phenomenon at the time, in hindsight, I think Anthony hit … Continue reading Sincerity in Fiction – A Lost Art in Need of Recovery

Thoughts on Trauma: How It Affects a Character’s Perceptions Before, During, and After Healing

Ruminating on Kryal’s fan fiction story, The Dragon-King’s Temple (described here, and available to read through this link here), a little while ago, something about the story struck and stuck with me. For those who have not read it, this fan fiction tale crosses Avatar: The Last Airbender* with Stargate SG-1* in an original episode … Continue reading Thoughts on Trauma: How It Affects a Character’s Perceptions Before, During, and After Healing

Thoughts on Tactics: How History Affects Fiction and Makes It Believable

Not long ago, this author discovered the above picture, which discusses some fans’ thoughts on how the Fellowship of the Ring might have simply flown to Mordor to dispose of the One Ring rather than “take the long way around.” As the commenter explains, this would have been a bad idea narratively because the entire … Continue reading Thoughts on Tactics: How History Affects Fiction and Makes It Believable

Lost in Translation: Communicating Past Language Barriers and Maneuvering Amidst Different Cultures

This author has little problem with the practice of reading fanfic. Her review of Richard Paolinelli’s ongoing Star Trek* fan fiction story (check it out, it is good) is proof of this. So it shouldn’t surprise anyone that last year, this writer ran across a very intriguing fan fiction tale written by Crossover Queen (also … Continue reading Lost in Translation: Communicating Past Language Barriers and Maneuvering Amidst Different Cultures

The Aspirational Hero: What He Is, and How to Write Him

The Aspirational Hero is similar to, but not quite like, the Iconic Hero. Although the two resemble each other, mainly in what K.M. Weiland* refers to as the Flat Character Arc, they are not the same thing. They are, rather, two distinct archetypes that have largely gone out of fashion in the West. You are … Continue reading The Aspirational Hero: What He Is, and How to Write Him