Writerly Sound Bites, Number 1: On Characters, Flaws, and What Really Makes a Flawed Hero Heroic

Something I have discovered over the years is that advice from those in the field of storytelling – or from those who teach creative writing – tends to fall into two categories. The first consists of long descriptions which can almost be considered stories in themselves. Reading through these dissertations and parsing them out can … Continue reading Writerly Sound Bites, Number 1: On Characters, Flaws, and What Really Makes a Flawed Hero Heroic

Thoughts on Tactics: How History Affects Fiction and Makes It Believable

Not long ago, this author discovered the above picture, which discusses some fans’ thoughts on how the Fellowship of the Ring might have simply flown to Mordor to dispose of the One Ring rather than “take the long way around.” As the commenter explains, this would have been a bad idea narratively because the entire … Continue reading Thoughts on Tactics: How History Affects Fiction and Makes It Believable

Setting the Emotional Scene – How to Prep the Audience for More

Last week’s Vocational Vivications’ linked post was from Nate Winchester. It focused on the need for emotional connections between characters to be established early on and built up over the course of the story, something that cannot be done by having them stand around discussing their feelings with or for one another. Actions speak louder … Continue reading Setting the Emotional Scene – How to Prep the Audience for More

Reposted: You cannot cheat emotion – go for quantity

Check out this great piece by Nate Winchester, readers: You cannot cheat emotion – go for quantity Something I realized analyzing a story that didn’t work. Obviously, when you write stories, you’re going to use little “cheats” here and there to flesh out the world and characters without having to actually dive deep into full histories. … Continue reading Reposted: You cannot cheat emotion – go for quantity

Shades and Shadows: The “Pulp” Aspects of Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings

There are writers who dislike how Professor Tolkien’s magnum opus is considered the last word in modern fantasy. Most of their argument revolves around how present authors in the field of fantasy ignore shorter action/adventure tales in the “pulp” format of fantasy for epics that practically copy and paste from The Lord of the Rings.* … Continue reading Shades and Shadows: The “Pulp” Aspects of Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings