The Fall of the Apprentice – A Compare and Contrast

Reading Charles Edward Pogue’s novelization of Dragonheart* – for which he also wrote the screenplay – I was struck again by an idea that had flitted through my mind on a previous occasion. This is the difference between the corruption of Einon, the prince in the film* and the novel Dragonheart, and the fall of … Continue reading The Fall of the Apprentice – A Compare and Contrast

Writerly Sound Bites, Number 5: Character Progression – Which Archetype Are You Using?

Last week we discussed “shock and awe” events in three popular serials. These events were supposedly meant for character development, but they only succeed in destroying said characters, along with the canon and continuity of the franchise. However, one has to wonder just why the actions forced on the characters mentioned in the previous post … Continue reading Writerly Sound Bites, Number 5: Character Progression – Which Archetype Are You Using?

Writerly Sound Bites, Number 4: Character Progression – Or Character Destruction?

Gunsmoke's main cast I was privy to a discussion on character progression sometime in the past month. While I did not take part in it, that conversation got me thinking: many storylines in a variety of franchises with long or established characters aim for “shock and awe” character changes. These usually happen when everything appears … Continue reading Writerly Sound Bites, Number 4: Character Progression – Or Character Destruction?

Writerly Sound Bites, Number 1: On Characters, Flaws, and What Really Makes a Flawed Hero Heroic

Something I have discovered over the years is that advice from those in the field of storytelling – or from those who teach creative writing – tends to fall into two categories. The first consists of long descriptions which can almost be considered stories in themselves. Reading through these dissertations and parsing them out can … Continue reading Writerly Sound Bites, Number 1: On Characters, Flaws, and What Really Makes a Flawed Hero Heroic

Thoughts on Tactics: How History Affects Fiction and Makes It Believable

Not long ago, this author discovered the above picture, which discusses some fans’ thoughts on how the Fellowship of the Ring might have simply flown to Mordor to dispose of the One Ring rather than “take the long way around.” As the commenter explains, this would have been a bad idea narratively because the entire … Continue reading Thoughts on Tactics: How History Affects Fiction and Makes It Believable

Setting the Emotional Scene – How to Prep the Audience for More

Last week’s Vocational Vivications’ linked post was from Nate Winchester. It focused on the need for emotional connections between characters to be established early on and built up over the course of the story, something that cannot be done by having them stand around discussing their feelings with or for one another. Actions speak louder … Continue reading Setting the Emotional Scene – How to Prep the Audience for More