A Listening Ear – A Look Back at the Dialogue from Star Wars Jedi Knight: Dark Forces II

Star Wars: Jedi Knight: Dark Forces II cutscenes and Light Side Ending https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w2DcbB2vZcc As has been said many times, this author is not much of a video gamer. Given how much time she must spend living, writing, reading, and handling the odd challenge, this is no surprise. There are only so many hours in a … Continue reading A Listening Ear – A Look Back at the Dialogue from Star Wars Jedi Knight: Dark Forces II

Review – Galen’s Way: A Starquest Novel of the 4th Age by Richard Paolinelli

Well! That was quite the ride, readers. I received this book as a free eARC in order to review it, and it was enormous fun. It felt like going to see a film you think you will recognize, only to find that there is a new movie on and you like it! From the blurb: … Continue reading Review – Galen’s Way: A Starquest Novel of the 4th Age by Richard Paolinelli

The Aspirational Hero: What He Is, and How to Write Him

The Aspirational Hero is similar to, but not quite like, the Iconic Hero. Although the two resemble each other, mainly in what K.M. Weiland* refers to as the Flat Character Arc, they are not the same thing. They are, rather, two distinct archetypes that have largely gone out of fashion in the West. You are … Continue reading The Aspirational Hero: What He Is, and How to Write Him

The History Behind Star Wars’ Special Effects

Check out this article, which describes in loving detail how George Lucas created his bombshell blockbuster in 1977: The Real Aerial Battles That Inspired Star Wars Born one year before the end of World War II, George Lucas turned a boyhood fascination into a space epic. By Cory Graff AIR & SPACE MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2020 In … Continue reading The History Behind Star Wars’ Special Effects

Is Subverting the Audience’s Expectations the Best Way to Go?

Writers today are often told that they absolutely have to subvert audience expectations in order to tell a compelling story. Notably, those who insist that authors do this never give a truly compelling case for why this has to be done with every single tale they tell. Most disturbingly, these advisers never say just where … Continue reading Is Subverting the Audience’s Expectations the Best Way to Go?

On the Subject of Prequels: The Bad, the Good, and the Better

Over at Amatopia, Alexander Hellene published this post on a dreaded – and occasionally dreadful – aspect of modern fiction. This is the “prequel,” the story that takes place before the original tale audiences have already come to love. In his article Alex asked whether or not a prequel can do more than take the … Continue reading On the Subject of Prequels: The Bad, the Good, and the Better