Review – The Last Straw: A Critical Autopsy of a Galaxy Far, Far Away by John C. Wright

The last time this author listened to an audiobook, it was on CD. While quite interesting, it required more attention than reading a novel. This means she had to be engaged in some kind of mindless activity that allowed her to focus on what is being read aloud rather than on what is before her … Continue reading Review – The Last Straw: A Critical Autopsy of a Galaxy Far, Far Away by John C. Wright

Children in Fiction, Part 3: Are Heroes and Heroines Interchangeable in Fiction?

Thus far we have discussed what a lack of children means in terms of world-building, along with fictional children and teens’ (often outrageous) adult-style behavior. Both these items were mentioned in Ms. R.J. Sheffler’s article here. Today’s subject, however, is not among the issues that writers encounter listed therein. Many writers, particularly in the Young … Continue reading Children in Fiction, Part 3: Are Heroes and Heroines Interchangeable in Fiction?

The Final Chapter – 4 Ways to View Powered Protagonists

This article is the fifth in a five part series dealing with the pitfalls and advantages of creating superpowered characters. Parts One, Two, Three, and Four may be read here, here, here, and here. Well, here we are, in the fifth part of this series on the pitfalls and advantages of creating superpowered characters! Previously … Continue reading The Final Chapter – 4 Ways to View Powered Protagonists

Of Limits and Strengths – What Does It Mean for a Hero to “Have the Power?”

This article is the fourth in a five part series dealing with the pitfalls and advantages of creating super powered characters. Parts One, Two, and Three may be read here, here, and here. When the topic of empowered protagonists comes up, it is almost universally stated that the characters’ superior abilities must be limited somehow. … Continue reading Of Limits and Strengths – What Does It Mean for a Hero to “Have the Power?”

Powered Protagonists: Does the Power Make the Hero, or Vice Versa?

This article is the first in a five part series dealing with the pitfalls and advantages of creating superpowered characters. Alexander Hellene over at Amatopia published a thought-provoking article last year. It revolved around creating characters that have superpowers, and it caught my attention because this is an aspect of storytelling which has fascinated me for years. … Continue reading Powered Protagonists: Does the Power Make the Hero, or Vice Versa?