Deductive Reasoning: A Detective’s Work in the Future

Among the series this author has returned to of late has been a single season title: Sherlock Holmes in the 22nd Century*. The show is not well-beloved by fans of the original Sir Arthur Conan Doyle* series because the animated tale takes several liberties with Holmes’ character. Since the show was meant for tweens and … Continue reading Deductive Reasoning: A Detective’s Work in the Future

A Unique Conceit (or Three) from Western Television

Gargoyles Retrospective | Disney's Dark Horse https://www.youtube.com/watch?app=desktop&v=hc7yQ4nX_8k Along with others in the Superversive movement, this author tends to highlight various writing techniques which are popularly seen in Japanese anime. Since writers in the Orient frequently make use of practices forgotten here in the West, this is only sensible. If one wishes to learn a craft, … Continue reading A Unique Conceit (or Three) from Western Television

Bulletin: “The Circle Is Now Complete!”

Well, almost complete. Tuscany Bay Books’ landmark anthology series, which they acquired from Superversive Press, has nearly wrapped up production. Planetary Anthology: Neptune*, the tenth book in the series, released this past December. There is now only one volume left to be published – Planetary Anthology: Saturn! (It is available for pre-order as an e-book … Continue reading Bulletin: “The Circle Is Now Complete!”

Review: The Most Expensive Alley Cat in London by Corinna Turner

I stumbled across this little treasure while surfing through Amazon’s Kindle store. Although I say “little,” the term is not meant to be derogatory; The Most Expensive Alley Cat in London is a short story. One can read it in under an hour, making it a small gem, indeed: A Desperate Urchin. A Mysterious Stray. … Continue reading Review: The Most Expensive Alley Cat in London by Corinna Turner

Depth in Fiction, Part One: The Desperate Need for Magic, Myth, and Mystery

This article is the first in a five part series about the skill of adding depth to fiction. ‘The mind that thought of light, heavy, grey, yellow, still, swift also conceived of magic that would make heavy things light and able to fly, turn grey lead into yellow gold, and the still rock into a swift water. If it could do … Continue reading Depth in Fiction, Part One: The Desperate Need for Magic, Myth, and Mystery