Mad Scientist: Cackling Goofball, or Deadly Menace?

The popular image of the mad scientist is one of a frizzy haired, generally harmless older man messing around in a lab. Such mad scientists seem and are typically portrayed as relatively inoffensive. Doctor Doofensmirtz from Phineas and Ferb* is one example of this common perception of the mad scientist, with Back to the Future’s* … Continue reading Mad Scientist: Cackling Goofball, or Deadly Menace?

An Intriguing Review of Final Fantasy VII and Final Fantasy VII Remake

It has been said many times here that this author is not a video game player. Even so, this does not mean that she does not keep a finger lightly on the pulse of the video game scene. It does not pay not to maintain an awareness of the competition, after all. Besides, good ideas … Continue reading An Intriguing Review of Final Fantasy VII and Final Fantasy VII Remake

Review – The Carter Files, Book 1: Phoenix by Lori Janeski

Liger Zero Phoenix No, fellow Zoids* fans, the title of the book being reviewed today has nothing to do with the franchise. I just couldn’t resist the reference. While it was not the best entry in the franchise by a long mile, not everything in Zoids: Fuzors was bad. Liger Zero and the Phoenix were … Continue reading Review – The Carter Files, Book 1: Phoenix by Lori Janeski

The Aspirational Hero: What He Is, and How to Write Him

The Aspirational Hero is similar to, but not quite like, the Iconic Hero. Although the two resemble each other, mainly in what K.M. Weiland* refers to as the Flat Character Arc, they are not the same thing. They are, rather, two distinct archetypes that have largely gone out of fashion in the West. You are … Continue reading The Aspirational Hero: What He Is, and How to Write Him

“Trail Dust Is Thicker’n Blood”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x02g4-XT_VU A true friend is someone who is there for you when he’d rather be anywhere else. – Len Wein Stargate SG-1 Daniel Jackson telling Colonel Jack O’Neill to leave him behind in “Within the Serpent’s Grasp”* after he has been mortally wounded is a scene that has remained in my memory for decades. Listening … Continue reading “Trail Dust Is Thicker’n Blood”

Children in Fiction, Part 2: Their Characterization and Interactions with Other Characters

Last week we covered the implications which severe depopulation would present to a fictional race that regarded children as a pathology and how this relates to world-building. In the same piece where she spoke about the necessity of children in fiction, Ms. R.J. Sheffler touched on another issue plaguing their appearance in modern tales. This … Continue reading Children in Fiction, Part 2: Their Characterization and Interactions with Other Characters

Killing Characters, Part 1: Is It Necessary to Make a Novel/Series Believable?

This article is the first in a three part series dealing with the demise of characters in fiction. One of the main literary movements of the last century, Realism, holds much of the modern literati in its thrall. Along with Naturalism and a resurgent Romanticism, this school of writing insists on killing off at least … Continue reading Killing Characters, Part 1: Is It Necessary to Make a Novel/Series Believable?

Quitting on the Desire to Live

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hGCMeI-5-ss While enjoying the above song from Skillet, this author was struck by a sudden revelation about modern fiction. There is an item missing from it that once was pronounced throughout myriad genres, especially sci-fi and fantasy. What is this absent thing? Only the most important ingredient of all, the one without which man cannot … Continue reading Quitting on the Desire to Live