Reposted: The Crucial Link Between Your Story’s Inciting Event and Climactic Moment

Take a look at this great article by K.M. Weiland, readers: The Crucial Link Between Your Story’s Inciting Event and Climactic Moment We talk about story being an arc, but in many ways it is more of a circle. A well-constructed story is a seamless whole in which its two halves reflect each other. We … Continue reading Reposted: The Crucial Link Between Your Story’s Inciting Event and Climactic Moment

Reposted: Afraid to Let Anyone Read Your Writing? 5 Steps to Move Past Your Fears

​Check out this amazing piece by K. M. Weiland, readers: Afraid to Let Anyone Read Your Writing? 5 Steps to Move Past Your Fears One of the best things about writing is being read. Unfortunately, that can also be one of the scariest things. When you’re just starting out, it can feel like a huge jump to … Continue reading Reposted: Afraid to Let Anyone Read Your Writing? 5 Steps to Move Past Your Fears

Is the Sky Really the Limit?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zlTTz_INxMg While listening to Thundercats, Ho! – Creating a Pop Culture Phenomenon, something said by one of the interviewees caught this author’s ear. For those who may not recognize the title of the linked video, Thundercats* was a 1980s animated television series for children. It focused on a race of humanoid cats or feline humanoids … Continue reading Is the Sky Really the Limit?

Reposted: Sometimes Writers Aren’t Actually Looking for Feedback

Check out this great post by Meg Dowell, readers: Sometimes Writers Aren't Actually Looking for Feedback Many, many writers are desperately searching for feedback on their work. And rightfully so. Constructive criticism boosts confidence and helps writers set goals for improvement. But not every writer wants (or needs) specific feedback on their work from strangers. … Continue reading Reposted: Sometimes Writers Aren’t Actually Looking for Feedback

Reposted: 4 Ways to Write Sequel Scenes to Grip Readers

Check out this great piece by K.M. Weiland, readers! 4 Ways to Write Sequel Scenes to Grip Readers Scene structure asks for a one-two punch pairing of action and reaction—or as Dwight V. Swain named them in what has come to be considered “classic” scene structure, scene and sequel. The need to write sequel scenes, … Continue reading Reposted: 4 Ways to Write Sequel Scenes to Grip Readers