Review: Cirsova Magazine of Thrilling Adventure and Daring Suspense, Issue #9/ Winter 2021

Cirsova Magazine is gearing up for the release of its Spring Issue for 2022, readers, so now seems to be a good time to review their 2021 Winter Issue*. This one has thrills and chills aplenty, with the cover story being particularly frightening. A word of free advice? Do not read that story in the … Continue reading Review: Cirsova Magazine of Thrilling Adventure and Daring Suspense, Issue #9/ Winter 2021

Writerly Sound Bites, Number 8: Character Progression – How Characters Broken by Trauma Recover and Rebuild, Part 3

Brunhilde (Marvel Comics) Thus far we have looked at how children and men are broken and remade in abusive situations. It is not a pleasant picture and the road back is rough even for the strongest members of each demographic. Manipulation cannot be overcome in an hour, perhaps not even a year; it takes time, … Continue reading Writerly Sound Bites, Number 8: Character Progression – How Characters Broken by Trauma Recover and Rebuild, Part 3

Telepathy in Fiction – A Lesson from Pacific Rim

By now this author’s record of interest with telepathy as a story device is well-documented. Andre Norton’s* work with this trope is the primary inspiration, in part because she described it so well as both magic and native talent. Her heroes and heroines of the Witch World have an ability not only to communicate with … Continue reading Telepathy in Fiction – A Lesson from Pacific Rim

Shades and Shadows: The “Pulp” Aspects of Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings

There are writers who dislike how Professor Tolkien’s magnum opus is considered the last word in modern fantasy. Most of their argument revolves around how present authors in the field of fantasy ignore shorter action/adventure tales in the “pulp” format of fantasy for epics that practically copy and paste from The Lord of the Rings.* … Continue reading Shades and Shadows: The “Pulp” Aspects of Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings

A Unique Conceit (or Three) from Western Television

Gargoyles Retrospective | Disney's Dark Horse https://www.youtube.com/watch?app=desktop&v=hc7yQ4nX_8k Along with others in the Superversive movement, this author tends to highlight various writing techniques which are popularly seen in Japanese anime. Since writers in the Orient frequently make use of practices forgotten here in the West, this is only sensible. If one wishes to learn a craft, … Continue reading A Unique Conceit (or Three) from Western Television

Lost in Translation: Communicating Past Language Barriers and Maneuvering Amidst Different Cultures

This author has little problem with the practice of reading fanfic. Her review of Richard Paolinelli’s ongoing Star Trek* fan fiction story (check it out, it is good) is proof of this. So it shouldn’t surprise anyone that last year, this writer ran across a very intriguing fan fiction tale written by Crossover Queen (also … Continue reading Lost in Translation: Communicating Past Language Barriers and Maneuvering Amidst Different Cultures

Is the Sky Really the Limit?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zlTTz_INxMg While listening to Thundercats, Ho! – Creating a Pop Culture Phenomenon, something said by one of the interviewees caught this author’s ear. For those who may not recognize the title of the linked video, Thundercats* was a 1980s animated television series for children. It focused on a race of humanoid cats or feline humanoids … Continue reading Is the Sky Really the Limit?

Children in Fiction, Part 3: Are Heroes and Heroines Interchangeable in Fiction?

Thus far we have discussed what a lack of children means in terms of world-building, along with fictional children and teens’ (often outrageous) adult-style behavior. Both these items were mentioned in Ms. R.J. Sheffler’s article here. Today’s subject, however, is not among the issues that writers encounter listed therein. Many writers, particularly in the Young … Continue reading Children in Fiction, Part 3: Are Heroes and Heroines Interchangeable in Fiction?